Articles

March 6, 2008

The Eye and the Mind by James WilliamsSophisticated ancient warrior arts had particular ways of using the eyes. This methodology maximized the brains ability to process information. The eyes don’t see, the brain “sees”. How the eyes are used determines how effectively the brain can process information. It also impacts how the brain perceives the passage of time. When the eyes are used properly, events slow down in relation to our ability to perceive sequence and rapidity of motion. >>> Read On…_______________________________________________________________________Systema: Principles of the Russian System by James WilliamsIf someone had told me a few years ago that out of a western Christian tradition would come a martial art as deep, sophisticated and evolved as the best of the oriental arts I would not have believed them.Yet there is such an art coming out of the ancient Russian culture with deep roots in the Russian Orthodox monasteries. At its root in the present day is an exceptional man, Mikhail Ryabko. Trained by one of Stalin’s Falcons from the age of five and beginning his operational career in the Russian Spetsnaz (Special Forces) at the age of 15, Mikhail Ryabko was not only given the secrets of this ancient art, he was put in the position of repeatedly applying both the art and its principles in life and death combat on, what for much of his early life, was a day-to-day basis. This System, taught by Mikhail Ryabko, is not a shadow of what once was, it is a living practical art that even now is being applied by warriors in combat. When working with Mikhail and his foremost student, Vladimir Vasiliev, one is struck by the calm depth of these men. Enormous knowledge and ability taught with calm, deep conviction.>>> Read On…_______________________________________________________________________The Psychology of Combat by James WilliamsI was pleased to see a review of the book “Bloody Iron” in Volume 24, No. 3 of Aikido Journal. Here is a book that speaks plainly about the reality of conflict with edged weapons in circumstances involving lethal force. The authors, both long time residents of some of Americas finest prisons, describe in detail the prison environment as regards to the edged weapons conflict that is a part of daily life.The nature of such situations is presented graphically so that there will be no mistake as to their grim reality. There is much to learn in this volume and perhaps some of the information can give insight into the training that was necessary for the feudal era warriors of Japan. >>>Read On…_______________________________________________________________________Virtue of the Sword by James WilliamsI was pleased to see a review of the book “Bloody Iron” in Volume 24, No. 3 of Aikido Journal. Here is a book that speaks plainly about the reality of conflict with edged weapons in circumstances involving lethal force. The authors, both long time residents of some of Americas finest prisons, describe in detail the prison environment as regards to the edged weapons conflict that is a part of daily life.The nature of such situations is presented graphically so that there will be no mistake as to their grim reality. There is much to learn in this volume and perhaps some of the information can give insight into the training that was necessary for the feudal era warriors of Japan. >>>Read On…

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